As we say goodbye to 2015 and ring in the New Year, it’s time to make some plans for Forgotten Fort Collins in 2016. These resolutions all revolve around stories that I’ve been wanting to pull together, but haven’t had the time to make happen yet. But this is going to be the year. (These are in no particular order.)

1. While interviewing Richard of Joe’s Auto Upholstery, I got a tip about a house that had been turned. You heard me — turned. Richard was able to tell me the why, but not the when, who, or how. This is a story that I can’t wait to share with you all. But it won’t be complete until I’m able to answer those questions. So be watching for the story of the house that turned a cold shoulder.

This house was being moved in 1966. This photo is from the Fort Collins Archive, Coloradoan collection. #C00903

This house was being moved in 1966. This photo is from the Fort Collins Archive, Coloradoan collection. #C00903

2. And speaking of changing directions, there are sooooo many times when I come across stories of houses that have been moved from one place to another. There are snippets here and there throughout the historic record, but there’s nothing that’s been pulled together that lists which houses were moved, and from where and to where. A comprehensive list would probably be years in the making. But this is the year I plan to start. I suspect there are a lot of good stories tied up on those houses. I can’t wait to find out what they are.

3. There’s a scale (the kind you stand on and get weighed) in First National Bank on Oak Street that got me to wondering yesterday: How many old artifacts do we have in town (but outside of museums) that are tied to the history of the City? And has anyone made a list of those or sought out their provenance? Yet another list that would take a long time to put together, but maybe this is the year to get started on that. (This one will require quite a bit of crowd-sourcing, methinks.)

4. I’m hoping to make substantial headway on my book this year. So my goal is to have at least one Forgotten Fort Collins post a month that’s related to the book. I won’t necessarily be telling you which post that is, so this isn’t necessarily something you’ll notice on your end. But it will hopefully help me get moving forward on my end.

A tax hearing in city council chambers in 1967. (FC Archive #C01476.)

A tax hearing in city council chambers in 1967. (FC Archive #C01476.)

5. I find the governmental system in Fort Collins to be incredibly interesting, especially after having lived in Detroit and San Francisco, both of which are run very differently than here. I want to know more about how the system evolved over time. The only problem is that I’ve done a wee bit of digging and the topic has put me to sleep. So this will probably be the hardest post I’ll pull together all year. I want to know the answers, but I fear the research will have about the same excitement level as a Tuesday night city council meeting. That’s why I think this one needs to be a resolution. I’m going to cover this topic if it means firmly planting myself in a café and caffeinating myself through hours of research.

If you have any recommendations or tips on where to start looking for information on the evolution of the Fort Collins government, I’m all ears. If you can think of a historic artifact that’s just sitting around somewhere where the public can see and access it, but they might not realize the story behind it, I’d love to know more. And if there’s something that you’re just chomping at the bit for me to write about this year and you want to make sure I know, just say the word!

Not all old ads are from the Victorian Era.

Not all old ads are from the Victorian Era.

Bonus resolution: I also resolve to get some advertisers on this blog this year. I’ve got to believe that there are business owners out there that feel our local history is important and who are willing to support local history education and get some advertising for their business at the same time. I’ve already started contacting some local business owners to invite them to jump on board, and I’m going to keep at it until I at least pull in enough money that I can cover my research expenses. Ideally I’d make enough that I can start calling this a job instead of a 20-hour-a-week hobby. If you’re a business owner and you’re interested, shoot me an email or check out our network press kit.