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I’m excited to announce that the Bee Family Centennial Farm has come on board as a nonprofit partner with Forgotten Fort Collins! The Bees are one of the oldest farming families in the Fort Collins/Wellington area. And they’ve turned a chunk of their property into an agricultural history museum that offers a bit of something for everyone.

There are other agricultural history museums in America, and we even have some information about the agricultural history of the Poudre River Valley at the Fort Collins Museum of Discovery. But what makes the Bee Family Farm truly unique is that it encompasses a lot of our local agricultural history, but it does so through the lens of one homesteading family that has been on their property for over 100 years (hence the “Centennial” in the name).

What this does is take all of our local agricultural history and present it through the story of one family. The changes that affected this family reflect the overall changes in agriculture in Northern Colorado. And when you come out for a visit, it’s possible that one of the Bee family descendants will be the one giving you a tour of the museum! Talk about making connections with history! You’d need a time machine to connect more directly than that.

The Bee Farm rooster looks like quite a character.

This Bee Farm rooster looks like quite a character.

The Bee Family Farm is located at 4320 E. County Road 58. — almost halfway between Anheuser-Busch and Wellington. But there’s no exit off of I-25 onto CR 58, so get off at Wellington or County Road 50 (the Anheuser-Busch exit) and take the frontage road till you get to County Road 58. The Museum is just to the east of the interstate.

Admission is $7 for adults $5 for seniors 60+, and $3 for children 3-12. Bring cash because they don’t take credit.

The museum is open Fridays and Saturdays from May to October.

Almost all of the items on display at the farm are original. (In other words, they weren't donated to the museum from other places.)

Almost all of the items on display at the farm are original. (In other words, they weren’t donated to the museum from other places.)

This is a great place for entire families to visit.  There’s all sorts of memorabilia that will trigger nostalgia in grandparents. There’s lots to see and do for all ages. And for little kids that love farm animals, they have chickens, goats, pigs, cows, cats and more.

There are also two special events that are held at the farm every year: The Vintage Baseball Game (June 25 this year) and Pioneer Living Day (September 24th). I’ll be writing more on both of those events as they come up. So stay tuned. (You can also get more information on these events, as well as several others happening in the area, by signing up to receive “History Now,” the monthly events newsletter that I compile and send out. There’s a link at right if you’re interested.)

These are old Bee family cars.

These are old Bee family cars.

Find out more about the Bee Family Farm on their website or check out this old post I wrote about the Farm Museum: A Visit to the Bee Family Centennial Farm Museum.